The color of CBD oil drops can range from clear or slightly golden, to a dark brown almost black. Color of the finished product is determined by several factors, including the type of CBD extract, the extraction method used, the carrier oil used and additional ingredients. Full spectrum (whole plant) extracts tend to be darker in color whereas isolates tend to be more clear.
The other notable difference between hemp and CBD oil is the amount of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), one of the 13 components found in cannabis. Hemp oil has low levels of THC (less than 25 parts in a million) while CBD can have as much as 15% CBD. In fact, one of the considerations to make when buying either of the oils is to check the amount of THC in the product as indicated on the label.
Buying online is less reliable still because there’s no regulation or standardization. What you see on the label may not be what you are getting. A 2017 study in JAMA found that of the 84 CBD products researchers bought online, 43% had more CBD than indicated, while 26% had less, and some had unexpected THC. “There’s a 75% chance of getting a product where the CBD is mislabeled,” says Marcu, one of the study’s coauthors.
Naturally, scientists wanted to see if CBD oil had any anticancer properties. As a result, they performed several animal studies using it. However, it should be noted that the findings don’t fully apply to humans. In fact, they merely suggest what possible effects CBD might have when it comes to dealing with cancer. With that in mind, additional human studies would help conclude if CBD oil has an effect on cancer cells in humans.
Although cannabis can be used to make marijuana, CBD itself is non-psychoactive—meaning that it doesn’t get you high the way smoking or eating cannabis-related products containing THC (the plant's psychoactive compound) can. Still, there’s a lot doctors don’t know about CBD and its effects on the body, and a lot consumers should understand before trying it.
×