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Now that cultivation of hemp has become legal in some parts of the world there are widespread discussions about how the medicinal properties of CBD oil is curing people of varied illnesses.  Since it is derived from hemp which is a strain of cannabis, people had apprehensions about this product but now with widespread media coverage usage has become common in therapy clinics. CBD is one of the many cannabidiols that exist naturally in the Cannabis plant along with THC.There is difference between  plants rich in CBD and those rich in THC as the former is called indica-dominant plants while latter is sativas rich plant. While sativas rich plants give an uplifting feeling, the indica rich plants give the body a relaxed feeling that is ideal for people in acute pain.

With the rapid rise in the popularity of CBD in everything from vape juice to lattes, many people are asking- “what is CBD oil?”. To answer that question, let’s first answer the question- what is CBD? CBD, short for cannabidiol, is a compound found in hemp plants. CBD’s benefits are numerous, making it a popular supplement. We’ll explore the effects of CBD oil in more depth below, but in short, it interacts with receptors that keep the body balanced and running normally.
Scott Shannon, M.D., assistant clinical professor at the University of Colorado, recently sifted through patient charts from his four-doctor practice to document CBD’s effects on anxiety. His study, as yet unpublished, found “a fairly rapid decrease in anxiety scores that appears to persist for months,” he says. But he says he can’t discount a placebo effect, especially since “there’s a lot of hype right now.”
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Isolate CBD is the CBD gets its extraction from the cannabis plant without other terpenes and cannabinoids. Many users of this CBD type consider this much better than the full spectrum. They go as far enough to get this type of CBD by isolating the CBD from others themselves. They are even different dosage methods and levels for each kind of CBDs and therefore should carefully be in separation for each of the CBD types.


ISA HERRERA HEARD IT from her patients first. "I have less pain." "I'm having less anxiety." "My menstrual cramps are less intense," they told the New York City physical therapist about taking CBD oil, a product containing cannabidiol, one of many chemicals found in the cannabis plant. "I was like, 'I need to find out more about this,'" recalls Herrera, who specializes in integrative pelvic floor therapies.
CBD and THC interact with our bodies in a variety of ways. One of the main ways they impact us is by mimicking and augmenting the effects of the compounds in our bodies called “endogenous cannabinoids” - so named because of their similarity to the compounds found in the cannabis plant. These “endocannabinoids” are part of a regulatory system called the “endocannabinoid system”.
Being a relatively inexpensive method it is preferred by small scale producers of CBD and THC oils. During extraction this method uses solvents like butane, ethanol and alcohol derived from grains. This method has several disadvantages the worst of which is potential of explosion while the second is leftover residue of these solvents. Scientists and doctors advice against the use of this method as it can make the end product unsafe for medical use and also can make existing medical condition much worse. When there are unsafe residues in CBD oil it reduces healing powers and can even compromise health of patients.
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CBD is one of over 110 active cannabinoids inside marijuana plants and is most predominant inside the resin glands (trichomes) of the female cannabis plant. Your body contains cell receptors known as cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinoids, found in cannabis, are agonists that bind to these receptors. Cannabinoid receptors can be found all over the body including, but not limited to, the:


Cutting-edge science has shown that the endocannabinoid system is dysregulated in nearly all pathological conditions. Thus, it stands to reason that “modulating endocannabinoid system activity may have therapeutic potential in almost all diseases affecting humans,” as Pal Pacher and George Kunos, scientists with the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), suggested in a 2014 publication.
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
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