In the 1970s, President Nixon declared a “War on Drugs” and signed into law the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. This law established a set of banned drugs and created the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). It also unintentionally outlawed one of the world’s oldest domesticated crop, hemp. This not only led to the demise of hemp, but also an increased misconception of the plant.

This category is a bit tongue-in-cheek, but it’s impossible to leave Lord Jones — the CBD darling of celebrities and social media — off this list, because it actually works. Beyond being chic AF and beautifully packaged, this luxe CBD oil tincture is a delicious sensory treat that comes in both lemon (featured here) and peppermint. We love that this lemon tincture is made in small batches and only contains five simple ingredients: Grape Seed Oil, Hempseed Oil, Lemon Oil, Hemp Oil, Stevia, and full-spectrum, phytocannabinoid-rich CBD extract.
The etymology is uncertain but there appears to be no common Proto-Indo-European source for the various forms of the word; the Greek term kánnabis is the oldest attested form, which may have been borrowed from an earlier Scythian or Thracian word.[10][11] Then it appears to have been borrowed into Latin, and separately into Slavic and from there into Baltic, Finnish, and Germanic languages.[12] Following Grimm's law, the "k" would have changed to "h" with the first Germanic sound shift,[10][13] after which it may have been adapted into the Old English form, hænep. However, this theory assumes that hemp was not widely spread among different societies until after it was already being used as a psychoactive drug, which Adams and Mallory (1997) believe to be unlikely based on archaeological evidence.[10] Barber (1991) however, argued that the spread of the name "kannabis" was due to its historically more recent drug use, starting from the south, around Iran, whereas non-THC varieties of hemp are older and prehistoric.[12] Another possible source of origin is Assyrian qunnabu, which was the name for a source of oil, fiber, and medicine in the 1st millennium BC.[12]

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If you haven’t been bombarded with CBD marketing or raves about it from friends, get ready. This extract—which comes from either marijuana or its industrial cousin, hemp—is popping up everywhere. There are CBD capsules, tinctures, and liquids for vaping plus CBD-infused lotions, beauty products, snacks, coffee, and even vaginal suppositories. Already some 1,000 brands of CBD products are available in stores—and online in states that don’t have lenient cannabis laws. This is a tiny fraction of what’s to come: The CBD market is poised to exceed $1 billion by 2020, per the Chicago-based research firm Brightfield Group.

This CBD oil tastes and smells like very grassy yet mild weed, it has a dark greenish hue, and it’s our favorite secret ingredient to add to cocktails or mocktails. The taste of this CBD oil is mellow enough for it to be discretely added to virtually any drink, but we think it works especially well in cocktails or mocktails that use other fresh, herbaceous ingredients like muddled cucumber, cilantro, or basil. Rosebud comes in varying strengths, including 350 milligrams, 1,000 milligrams, and this 700-milligram variety (featured) that we find strikes the best balance for our everyday needs.
Make no mistake about it, both tinctures and concentrates are easy to take, but capsules offer the easiest way to incorporate CBD into your life. Tablets contain up to 25mg of CBD, so it is easier your daily intake per serving. On the downside, capsules are not ideal when you want to increase your serving or when trying to establish which dosage works for you.
Maintaining an optimal level of wellness is absolutely crucial to live a higher quality life. Wellness matters. Wellness matters because everything we do and every emotion we feel relates to our well-being. In turn, our well-being directly affects our actions and emotions. It’s an ongoing circle. Therefore, it is important for everyone to achieve optimal wellness in order to subdue stress, reduce the risk of illness and ensure positive interactions.

Industrial hemp farmers tend to aim to grow the plants up, not out as is the case with medicinal cannabis – and the taller, the better. This is because some of the great value of industrial hemp in fibre based applications is primarily in its stalk rather than leaves. Industrial hemp is grown at quite high density – another major difference to the cultivation of subsp. indica.
Customer Service: In the past, we’ve had some issues with confusing responses from 4 Corners, but their customer service has improved a lot. We got fast, thorough responses to our inquiries through email, phone, and Facebook. They’ve also made their return policy a lot more generous (30 days for opened or unopened products), and instituted free shipping on any purchase.
Unlike THC, which primarily binds to CB-1 receptors located in the brain, CBD works in the body by manipulating receptors throughout organ tissues, the immune system, the pain response system, the hormonal system, and other whole-body regulatory systems. Basically, since its receptors have been found to exist in virtually every cell and tissue type in the body, CBD is believed to work on every aspect of human health and behavior – from the subcellular level to the whole-body leve and beyond.

As the name suggests, concentrates contain a high level of CBD in comparison to other products. In fact, concentrates can carry up to ten times more saturation. When placed side by side with tinctures, concentrates are even easier to use and are less messy. Even then, there are no flavored options. Concentrates are a good choice if you’re a busy person.


“I have been searching for an alternative to anxiety drugs. My niece, who is an alternative health care worker, recommended this product. I was amazed at how quickly it worked only after 2 days, I felt relief. Being on prescription medication for over 3 years with side effects, I have recommended this to my family & friends. So I would absolutely recommend this product to anyone looking for a safe alternative for anxiety. Thank you!“
Carol, thanks for your long and detailed post, and the links. In your paragraph where you reference various effects, you write “cannabis” several times. There are several components of “cannabis”, THC is the more psychoactive component – and current varieties have been bred/engineered to have ever increasing concentrations of this. CBD is another component, which has different and in some cases opposing effects vs. THC. Are the statements you made about effects of “cannabis”, do they center on THC, consumption/use of the whole plant, or have they broken out a purified CBD product and tested the impacts of just that component. Earnest question.
Cannabidiol (CBD) is a naturally-occurring compound found in cannabis. It’s known for therapeutic properties and has no psychoactive effects. CBD oil is typically extracted from cannabis plants using either CO2 or ethanol extraction methods. It’s then incorporated into common CBD oil products, including tinctures (drops), vape liquids, gummies, capsules and topical creams and lotions. CBD oil derived from hemp has less than 0.3% THC so is federally legal in the U.S. and can be purchased online or in some local stores. CBD oil derived from marijuana has more than 0.3% THC so can only be purchased at licensed dispensaries in states where medical marijuana is legal.
The results “suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction,” the study authors wrote—but they also admit that their findings are preliminary. Ryan Vandrey, PhD, a cannabis researcher and associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University (who was not involved in the 2013 study), agrees that larger, longer-term studies are needed to know if CBD might be helpful for smokers looking to kick the habit.
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