If you haven’t been bombarded with CBD marketing or raves about it from friends, get ready. This extract—which comes from either marijuana or its industrial cousin, hemp—is popping up everywhere. There are CBD capsules, tinctures, and liquids for vaping plus CBD-infused lotions, beauty products, snacks, coffee, and even vaginal suppositories. Already some 1,000 brands of CBD products are available in stores—and online in states that don’t have lenient cannabis laws. This is a tiny fraction of what’s to come: The CBD market is poised to exceed $1 billion by 2020, per the Chicago-based research firm Brightfield Group.
Moreover, scientists at the Cajal Institute showed promising results in regards to CBD and Multiple Sclerosis. They used animal models and cell cultures to find that CBD reversed inflammatory responses; within only ten days, mice that were used in the study had superior motor skills and showed progression in their condition. To date, there have been well over 20,000 published scientific articles on cannabinoids and their related effects on all sorts of medical ailments.

Ehler Danlos has recently been found to be caused by hereditary alpha tryptasemia with mast cell activation. You are born with extra copies of the alpha tryptase gene. Tryptase levels can be lowered by lactoferrin found in the supplement colostrum. Also, supplement with luteolin which inactivates mast cells. The cells of connective tissue include fibroblasts, adipocytes, macrophages, mast cells and leucocytes. Histamine activates mast cells increasing inflammation which attacks connective tissue, so eat an anti-histamine diet which lowers inflammation. To lower histamine levels, eat only fresh foods- eggs, chicken, rice, gluten free pasta/crackers, cream cheese, butter, coconut oil, olive oil, non-citrus juices, milk, herbal teas (not coffee, black tea), fresh/frozen fish, fresh/frozen fruits and vegetables, especially prebiotics like onions, garlic, bananas, jicama, raw asparagus. No tomatoes, strawberries, vinegar, matured cheeses, pickled/canned foods, shellfish, salami and other cured meats, sausages, ham, bologna, etc. No beans, nuts chocolate, peanut butter, ready meals, deli food because its been sitting, energy drinks, as these are all high in histamines. The key to low histamine is fresh. Eat knox gelatin daily with vitamin C which strengthens connective tissue. Gelatin is high in the amino acids- glycine, proline and lysine which are needed for collagen production in connective tissue. No aspirin, alcohol, high sugar, fructose, or high carbs to heal leaky gut. In fact, inflammation throughout the body can be mediated by the gut bacteria, and loss of gut bacterial diversity can threaten the gut lining, so then that leakiness of the gut, or intestinal permeability, then mechanistically leads to inflammation. Bacteria from the gut leaks into the bloodstream causing inflammation. Then where does that inflammation go and what part of the body gets damaged from it? Connective tissue. Inflammation is the cornerstone of basically every degenerative condition you don’t want to get. Check your progesterone levels which should be normalized. Progesterone’s role in the health of the body’s connective tissue or collagen is well understood. As progesterone strengthens collagen and increases the turnover of cells, the skin becomes softer and stronger. 70% of the skin is collagen, as is 20% of the entire body- tendon, ligament, blood vessels, skin, cornea, cartilage, bone, blood, blood vessels, gut, intervertebral disc, brown and white adipose tissue. https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/hereditary-alpha-tryptasemia-faq
Separation of hurd and bast fiber is known as decortication. Traditionally, hemp stalks would be water-retted first before the fibers were beaten off the inner hurd by hand, a process known as scutching. As mechanical technology evolved, separating the fiber from the core was accomplished by crushing rollers and brush rollers, or by hammer-milling, wherein a mechanical hammer mechanism beats the hemp against a screen until hurd, smaller bast fibers, and dust fall through the screen. After the Marijuana Tax Act was implemented in 1938, the technology for separating the fibers from the core remained "frozen in time". Recently, new high-speed kinematic decortication has come about, capable of separating hemp into three streams; bast fiber, hurd, and green microfiber.
The etymology is uncertain but there appears to be no common Proto-Indo-European source for the various forms of the word; the Greek term kánnabis is the oldest attested form, which may have been borrowed from an earlier Scythian or Thracian word.[10][11] Then it appears to have been borrowed into Latin, and separately into Slavic and from there into Baltic, Finnish, and Germanic languages.[12] Following Grimm's law, the "k" would have changed to "h" with the first Germanic sound shift,[10][13] after which it may have been adapted into the Old English form, hænep. However, this theory assumes that hemp was not widely spread among different societies until after it was already being used as a psychoactive drug, which Adams and Mallory (1997) believe to be unlikely based on archaeological evidence.[10] Barber (1991) however, argued that the spread of the name "kannabis" was due to its historically more recent drug use, starting from the south, around Iran, whereas non-THC varieties of hemp are older and prehistoric.[12] Another possible source of origin is Assyrian qunnabu, which was the name for a source of oil, fiber, and medicine in the 1st millennium BC.[12]

According to the results of a study published in Neuropharmacology, CBD oil can help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. The research sought to find out the effect of CBD on non-obese, diabetes-prone females mice. Only 32% of the mice administered with CBD contracted diabetes in comparison to 100% of the group that didn’t receive a CBD injection.
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