There are thousands of unique varieties of hemp. The cultivars used for CBD oil contain significantly higher concentrations of CBD than others. Using these uniquely potent plants, it is possible to extract cannabis oil that contains significant levels of cannabidiol, as well as essential vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, terpenes, flavonoids, and other non-psychoactive cannabinoids.
Scott Shannon, M.D., assistant clinical professor at the University of Colorado, recently sifted through patient charts from his four-doctor practice to document CBD’s effects on anxiety. His study, as yet unpublished, found “a fairly rapid decrease in anxiety scores that appears to persist for months,” he says. But he says he can’t discount a placebo effect, especially since “there’s a lot of hype right now.”
Before we directly compare the both, let’s break down what each is. Full spectrum CBD oil comes with all the cannabinoids present in hemp. If you see full spectrum hemp CBD oil for sale, it’ll include many cannabis compounds such as Cannabicycol (CBL), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), Cannabinol (CBN), Cannabichromevarinic Acid (CBCVA) and more. It also contains a very small amount of THC, (.3%, as is legally allowed).
Full spectrum CBD, like hemp oil, contains every cannabinoid present in the cannabis plant. This means cannabidiol, cannabicyclol, tetrahydrocannabivarin, and cannbichromevinaric acid, to name a few. In full spectrum CBD oil, there is nothing held back or left out. These mixed together compliment each other and produce an entourage effect. This effect is good for the health of the user because the individual is taking all of the properties of all the terpenes and cannabinoid mixed together. All of these combined properties make the user absorbent of more effective effect and treatment. The treatment is very much beneficial for the health of the user hence that is why many users consider the full spectrum CBD far better than Isolate is CBD. Most products of CBD are from full-spectrum CBD.

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