so you can just make up a new plant because it don’t get the user high? Hemp is Cannabis. PERIOD. The Farm Bill and No amount of silly dialog can create a new botanical entry. Hemp IS Cannabis. Cannabis Ruderalis, native to Russia, also called ditch weed….may be imported as Hemp but it IS Cannabis Ruderalis. The semantic name calling game is kept in motion because it serves the desires of those that profit on the confusion. Bottomline, there is Cannabis. Some Cannabis can be used to fight disease. Oligodenroglioma (in my case) and some of it can be used to alter one’s outlook……but it’s all Cannabis. Grow it in South Carolina and call it Hemp, I say God bless you, bring it to my lab and it comes out as cannabis and it’s going to be called Cannabis. Disclaimer, while I do have oligodendroglioma, I do not personally have a lab ;). M.

Zynerba is no longer pursuing a version of that drug for osteoarthritis, says Dr. Clauw, and there are currently no standard recommendations for what dosage or formulation of CBD (in either oral or topical form) might work best for pain relief. But he does want pain patients to know that CBD products may be worth a try—and that they may provide relief, even without the high that products with THC produce.

This is probably the most common question and perhaps the most difficult to answer. CBD is believed to interact with our own cannabinoid system, which means how we interact with CBD individually depends on our tolerance as well as our immunity. Therefore, one dose may work for one person and not the other. Surprisingly, it has nothing to do with weight, but once again our own system. This is why our physician recommends starting low and slow until you achieve the results you are looking for with the oil.

In 1937, the Marijuana Tax Act strictly regulated the cultivation and sale of all cannabis varieties. The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 classified all forms of cannabis — including hemp — as a Schedule I drug, making it illegal to grow it in the United States (which is why we’re forced to import hemp from other countries as long as it contains scant levels of THC — 0.3% is the regulation for hemp cultivation in the European Union and Canada). As a result of this long-term prohibition, most people have forgotten the industrial uses of the plant and continue to misidentify hemp with its cannabis cousin, marijuana.
With the current rage and interest in Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, after the legalization of medical marijuana, the question “does CBD oil work?” isn’t a big surprise. Cannabidiol oil is a trending product in states where marijuana is legalized. Some questions people ask like the side effects of CBD, how effective is it, how does it work, how can it be used and more are some questions we hope to answer in this post.

Hemp oil (also called hemp seed oil) is extracted from the hemp seeds of the hemp plant and it contains very little or no THC. Cannabis, on the other hand, has THC levels above 0.3 percent (usually between 5-35 percent). Because of its low THC levels, you can use hemp oil without feeling “high” afterwards. Hemp is typically grown for industrial purposes, as it’s used to make clothing, paper, ropes, carpets, construction materials and plastic composites.
Hemp-derived CBD oil products will not get you “high” since they contain little or no THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. They are also now federally legal in the United States following the signing of the 2018 Farm Bill. Of course more medical research studies are needed, but it’s expected that these products will continue to gain even more mainstream acceptance in the plant-based wellness communities.
Those who are looking for a unique and high-end form of cannabidiol products may want to look into Lord Jones. The products come in the form of tinctures, edibles, lotion, and even gumdrops. The formulas are also designed to provide users with relief from aches, pains, stress, and so much more. Better yet, the products come in unique and tantalizing flavors, including mango chili and sugarplum.
Daniel Clauw, MD, professor of anesthesiology at the University of Michigan, believes that CBD may have real benefits for people living with chronic pain. He cites a recent clinical trial from pharmaceutical company Zynerba (for which Dr. Clauw has consulted) that found that a CBD-derived topical drug provided pain relief to patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis.
×