At this point in time we have multiple states selling medical marijuana and other states looking to jump on board where there are other states that seemingly will never be open to the idea of legal cannabis. The decision on cannabidiol isn’t getting any easier, and company propaganda isn’t helping any. I think it’s obvious after talking to people from both sides of the spectrum that this choice is not cut and dry, and instead is something that you, the cannabidiol buyer, has to educate yourself on so you can make a fully informed decision.  While there are still choices for you to make, I now hope you have the information and facts to make an educated choice.

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The plants are cultivated and then sent for extraction. Some CBD oil-based products come from whole plant extracts. Others are derived from isolates. Whole plant extraction is self-explanatory. The entire plant is part of the process. Those in the medical communities prefer this method. They believe that a broader spectrum of cannabinoids yields during whole plant extraction. According to medical specialists, capturing the entire cannabinoid spectrum stimulates the endocannabinoid system. They call this the “entourage effect.”
With that being said, let’s discuss the wonderful thing we call CBD oil. CBD, cannabidiol, is one of over 85 active cannabinoids identified in hemp and other cannabis plants. CBD oil is derived from hemp, due to its abundance naturally occurring in the plant. CBD oil is extracted using the whole plant, stalks or flowers. Since hemp contains only trace amounts of THC, CBD oil products are non-intoxicating. 
That leaves those touting CBD’s effectiveness pointing primarily to research in mice and petri dishes. There, CBD (sometimes combined with small amounts of THC) has shown promise for helping pain, neurological conditions like anxiety and PTSD, and the immune system—and therefore potentially arthritis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and more.
Another major reason why CBD oil has been positively received in some parts of the medical community is its apparent effect on cancer and tumor growth.A study done by the researchers of the Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology, University of Rostock, Germany recommends the use of CBD oil (even direct injection into tumors) to eliminate or reduce the size of the tumors. The antioxidants in CBD hemp oil also provide anti-mutagenic properties and lower users’ risk of cancer.

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And, if you do luck out and get a tincture truly containing CBD, you'll likely dish out $200 or so to take 10 to 40 milligrams daily. Since research participants take closer to 1,000 milligrams a day, it's hard to imagine a benefit without drinking the whole (expensive, calorie-dense) bottle, Tishler says. "Most people will adjust their doses based on what they're comfortable spending," Asquith says.
That leaves those touting CBD’s effectiveness pointing primarily to research in mice and petri dishes. There, CBD (sometimes combined with small amounts of THC) has shown promise for helping pain, neurological conditions like anxiety and PTSD, and the immune system—and therefore potentially arthritis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and more.

CBD is simply an active chemical compound, or cannabinoid, that’s found in the cannabis plant. The reason it’s becoming so popular across such a wide audience of people right now though is because unlike the other main compound in cannabis (THC), it doesn’t get you high. There have been thousands upon thousands of medical studies showing all of the health benefits that CBD has, but “average” people are loving it because it doesn’t produce any mind-altering psychoactive effects.
The Internet is lousy with the stuff, but for a safe and reliable source, talk to your physician, advises McLaughlin. She may be able to introduce you to a reputable practitioner who can offer CBD oils and related therapies—or she may know of a colleague who can make a referral. If you’re trying to treat a medical condition, it’s better to avoid the guesswork and find guidance from a practitioner who’s had experience in—and is knowledgeable about—the most reliable CBD products and doses for your condition. Here are 14 things you should never lie to your doctor about.

While cannabidiol (CBD) is all the rage at present, it is often hard to understand what you are getting. Furthermore, with so many different CBD products on the market, it’s hard to tell which are full spectrum, which are not and which products are made from CBD cannabis or CBD hemp.  In this article we will try to clear up any confusion, focusing the major part of the post around Full Spectrum CBD oil.


Full spectrum CBD includes hundreds of active compounds, each in varying amounts and potencies, each with their own subtle action. The Entourage Effect predicts that some of these compounds can work in concert with each other to produce larger effects than they could individually, and that some compounds support the actions of others or even help render active compounds that normally wouldn’t be.
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
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