3. Reduce Stress-This step is usually easier said than done. Reducing stress is a key element of our overall wellness. Stress affects many parts of our bodies and minds in a negative way. Some everyday ways to reduce stress is to take a moment to breathe deeply, relax your muscles from head to toe, take up yoga or tai chi, meditate or even splurge on a massage. Find what works best for you. At work get organized, declutter your desk, make lists of what you must accomplish and learn to say “no” sometimes. Your overall wellness will thank you.
A crop for the future? With modern farming in big trouble, farmers are being paid not to cultivate their land, and food mountains are burnt in developed countries, while billions of people go hungry in developing countries. Hemp represents a lifeline crop for rural and hunger-prone areas, of particular value for its' versatility and organic nature. A famine-stricken village could clothe, house and feed themselves from one hemp field!

Published in partnership with cbd-oil.co.nz. Dr Ron Goedeke, specializes in alternative and functional medicine. He is a foundation member of the New Zealand college of Appearance medicine and has been a member of the American Academy of Anti-aging medicine since 1999. With over 20 years of experience in the anti-aging field, Dr Ron Goedeke is recognized as one of New Zealand’s leaders in this new and growing field of medicine.


We have receptors for cannabinoids in the whole body, but the first type – CB1 – are very dense in the pain pathways of the brain, spine, and nerves. The second type – CB2 – is more important for the immune system but is also involved in inflammation. By gently acting on both pathways, our internal cannabinoids and CBD can balance both pain and inflammation [R+].
Moreover, scientists at the Cajal Institute showed promising results in regards to CBD and Multiple Sclerosis. They used animal models and cell cultures to find that CBD reversed inflammatory responses; within only ten days, mice that were used in the study had superior motor skills and showed progression in their condition. To date, there have been well over 20,000 published scientific articles on cannabinoids and their related effects on all sorts of medical ailments.
Carol, thanks for your long and detailed post, and the links. In your paragraph where you reference various effects, you write “cannabis” several times. There are several components of “cannabis”, THC is the more psychoactive component – and current varieties have been bred/engineered to have ever increasing concentrations of this. CBD is another component, which has different and in some cases opposing effects vs. THC. Are the statements you made about effects of “cannabis”, do they center on THC, consumption/use of the whole plant, or have they broken out a purified CBD product and tested the impacts of just that component. Earnest question.
The National Cancer Institute details several studies into the anti-tumor effects of CBD. One study in mice and rats suggest CBDs “may have a protective effect against the development of certain types of tumors.” CBDs may do this by inducing tumor cell death, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and by controlling and inhibiting the spread of cancer cells.
Zynerba is no longer pursuing a version of that drug for osteoarthritis, says Dr. Clauw, and there are currently no standard recommendations for what dosage or formulation of CBD (in either oral or topical form) might work best for pain relief. But he does want pain patients to know that CBD products may be worth a try—and that they may provide relief, even without the high that products with THC produce.
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