That leaves those touting CBD’s effectiveness pointing primarily to research in mice and petri dishes. There, CBD (sometimes combined with small amounts of THC) has shown promise for helping pain, neurological conditions like anxiety and PTSD, and the immune system—and therefore potentially arthritis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and more.
I’ve done a little research on the hemp and cannabis, and it looks to me like they’re both supposed to be medicine plants. From what I learned about the plants, they’ve been known to actually have multiple health benefits and even save lives of fourth stage cancer patients, sending the cancer into remission and therefore saving the patient lives. Banning this medicine plant has actually caused the deaths of many people who could have otherwise been saved by this plant. No wonder people are getting it other ways, I don’t blame them as long as it’s strictly for medical purposes. I even heard of a case where one child’s seizures were so bad they had to end up moving to Colorado as a last resort to save that little girl’s life by giving her cannabis because no other medicine worked for her.

To clarify, high-CBD cannabis oil is non-psychoactive and apparently even more beneficial than high-THC cannabis oil. Cannabidiol is another cannabinoid in the cannabis plant, like the more well-known psychoactive cannabinoid THC, with significant research suggesting neuroprotectant, anticancer, antidiabetic, anti-ischemic, antispasmodic, antipsychotic, and antibacterial properties, among others. Furthermore, cannabis oil is a type of extract from cannabis.
There has been a dramatic rise in news attention to medicinal cannabis in 2013, with reports on CNN, ABC, CBS, and local publications about high-cannabidiol cannabis oil effectively controlling the symptoms of rare epileptic conditions like Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, infantile spasms, cortical dysplasia, and more. These diseases can cause hundreds to thousands of seizures a week, while also impairing development in a number of other ways. For families with children suffering from such conditions, the challenges are overwhelming.
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Under federal law, cannabis (from which both CBD and marijuana are derived) is illegal everywhere, although the laws against it aren’t generally enforced in states that have legalized marijuana. Some manufacturers claim that CBD culled from legally imported industrial hemp, which has little to no THC, is fine to ship across the U.S., but many experts disagree, noting that because hemp comes from the same species as marijuana, cannabis sativa, all CBD falls under the DEA’s Schedule 1 designation. “This creative interpretation of the law runs afoul of reality,” says the Brookings Institution, a Washington, DC, think tank.
In this review, the effects of cannabinoids in the regulation of the following endocrine systems are discussed: the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex axis. Cannabis users have reduced levels of gonadotropins, reduced prolactin and growth hormone. Cannabis affects corticotropin-releasing hormone-, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-, vasopressin-, and oxytocin-expressing neurons. Therefore, our findings reveal a mechanism of rapid glucocorticoid feedback inhibition of hypothalamic hormone secretion via endocannabinoid release in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and provide a link between the actions of glucocorticoids and cannabinoids in the hypothalamus that regulate stress and energy homeostasis. Glucocorticoid negative feedback in the brain controls stress, feeding, and neural-immune interactions by regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Cannabis increases dopamine which decreases prolactin. Cannabis decreases oxytocin, thyroid hormone and growth hormone, and disrupts the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Cannabinoids suppress fertility via reducing hypothalamic gonadotropin- releasing hormone output. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R)-mediated transmission is a major input to gonadotropin releasing hormone cells that can be excitatory. Cannabinoids act via inhibiting GABAergic input. Cannabis disregulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis circadian rhythm. Cannabis decreases serum concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins. Cannabis raises cortisol and ACTH which increases cortisol which uses up progesterone reducing testosterone and estrogen. Cannabis lowers testosterone in men by inhibiting testosterone secretion and impairs fertility in males through alteration in the testicular endocannabinoid system. Cannabis suppresses copulatory behavior even when testosterone levels are maintained. It decreases sperm concentration, causes defective sperm function or alteration of sperm morphology. Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. Testicular degeneration and necrosis is induced by chronic administration of cannabis. In both ovulating and menopausal women, cannabis can alter pituitary gonadotropin release and alter metabolism or target tissue response to gonadal steroids, leading to reduced estrogen and progesterone production and anovulatory menstrual cycles. Cannabis presents abnormal longer ovulatory cycle lengths in females. Cannabis suppresses luteinizing hormone when sex hormones are initially high, but, chronic cannabis lowers progesterone and testosterone in men, and lowers estrogen and progesterone in women, so luteinizing hormone significantly increases which raises night time core temperature for disrupted sleep. Cannabis increases hypothalamic nitric oxide which inhibits oxytocin. Cannabis is detrimental for lactating moms. Cannabis decreases maternal care, decreases aggressive instinctual behaviors for protection of young, suppresses maternal anxiolysis, decreases plasma oxytocin levels and milk consumption and decreases activation of oxytocinergic neurons in hypothalamic nuclei. Changes in the behavioral responses of lactating mothers treated with cannabis can be related to disruption in the neuroendocrine control of oxytocin secretion. Cannabis causes impairment of glucocorticoid feedback which either enhances or decreases performance on various tasks. Cannibis can cause a decrease in thyroid which negatively affects cerebellar development and motor performance involved in adult brain function. It induces consistent behavioral changes in adults, leading to severe anxiety and morphological changes in the hippocampus, however, it shows improvements for schizophrenia: improvement in cognitive function and reduction of antipsychotic-side. Cannabis and Δ(9) -THC are anticonvulsant in most animal models but can be proconvulsant in some healthy animals. The simultaneous rapid stimulation of nitric oxide and endocannabinoid synthesis by glucocorticoids has important implications for the impact of stress on the brain as well as on neural-immune interactions in the hypothalamus. Cannabis has implications for psychosis. There are blunted psychotomimetic and amnestic effects with cannabis. Lithium increases oxytocin and helps in cannabis withdrawal, and pregnenolone/progesterone help in cannabis withdrawal as estrogen generally increases and progesterone decreases sensitivity to marijuana.
Published in partnership with cbd-oil.co.nz. Dr Ron Goedeke, specializes in alternative and functional medicine. He is a foundation member of the New Zealand college of Appearance medicine and has been a member of the American Academy of Anti-aging medicine since 1999. With over 20 years of experience in the anti-aging field, Dr Ron Goedeke is recognized as one of New Zealand’s leaders in this new and growing field of medicine.
We all know of Charlotte’s Web; the miracle strain that is packed with a high concentration of CBD. The Charlotte’s Web Cannabis Strain was named after Charlotte Figi, who suffers from Dravet syndrome and was experiencing several seizures daily until the Stanley Brothers came up with this powerful strain. Since then, Charlotte’s web has been morphed into various products, including their famous Charlotte’s Web CBD oil.
Despite this progress, hemp businesses in the US have had difficulties expanding as they have faced challenges in traditional marketing and sales approaches. According to a case study done by Forbes, hemp businesses and startups have had difficulty marketing and selling non-psychoactive hemp products, as some online advertising platforms and financial institutions do not distinguish between hemp and marijuana.[104]
However, cannabidiol as an anxiety reducer has almost none of these issues. One study had participants who took either 600 mg of CBD or a placebo drug. In a speaking test that followed, the group which underwent CBD oil treatment showed less anxiety. They also had a smaller degree of cognitive impairment and felt less discomfort overall as they spoke. In other words, their results were better than those of the placebo group.
While the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 had just been signed into law, the United States Department of Agriculture lifted the tax on hemp cultivation during WW II.[141] Before WW II, the U.S. Navy used Jute and Manila Hemp from the Philipines and Indonesia for the cortage on their ships. During the war, Japan cut off those supply lines.[142] America was forced to turn inward and revitalize the cultivation of Hemp on U.S. soils.
I have just started on my CBD journey. This is day 3. My knees do not hurt and I am definitely able to tell the difference when things were off. The nights are pain-free. I have a job that I spend a lot of time on my feet, and easily do over 14000 steps just for my job. My feet use to hurt so bad by the end of the night, that I actually would cry on the drive home. This allows me to have much less pain, and an easier time falling and staying asleep.
Members of the MS community are more likely to experience symptoms of depression and anxiety, compared to individuals without MS. Worry and stress are common, and this type of emotional burden can take a toll on one’s health and relationships. Effective treatments as well as strategies to minimize the challenges are available. Please visit this section for more information.
No, as long as the plant is used correctly then no it’s not a bad thing. I’m sure there’s probably more good capability about that plant that people know or don’t know. No matter how it’s administered, as long as used properly it’s a good thing. It probably has more healing capabilities than people know about and since big Pharma or whoever it is out there discovered this, that’s probably why they made it illegal for all we know. Yes, I know there’s no money in cure which would hurt big Pharma but oh well! If they want to keep us away from the cure and keep us all sick, I say go for it anyway and go for the cure.
Dosage is important, because CBD can have side effects—the most common are tiredness, diarrhea, and changes in appetite and weight—so it’s best not to take more than you need. As CBD becomes more prevalent, says J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., a psychiatrist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, “I’m reasonably certain new kinds of side effects will emerge.”
Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
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