The results “suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction,” the study authors wrote—but they also admit that their findings are preliminary. Ryan Vandrey, PhD, a cannabis researcher and associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University (who was not involved in the 2013 study), agrees that larger, longer-term studies are needed to know if CBD might be helpful for smokers looking to kick the habit.
Hemp can be used as a "mop crop" to clear impurities out of wastewater, such as sewage effluent, excessive phosphorus from chicken litter, or other unwanted substances or chemicals. Additionally, hemp is being used to clean contaminants at the Chernobyl nuclear disaster site, by way of a process which is known as phytoremediation—the process of clearing radioisotopes and a variety of other toxins from the soil, water, and air.[47]
For the record, for all the super sensitive people out there, I want to comment that CBD oil CAN get you high. NO REALLY. It can. And I’m talking about Elixinol. the recommended brand here, not some random adulterated stuff, not some high cbd marijuana, actual purified, tested, industrial hemp oil. I have chronic fatigue syndrome and experienced with my own body all the same effects from Elixinol, that I have gotten from eating a weed cookie (less intense, but still unpleasant). For me these side effects include full body convulsions and tremors lasting over an hour, anxiety and panic, disturbing disassociative and repetitive/confusing thought patterns, cottonmouth, and intense emotions and weeping. This was from 90mg CBD content at once. Which is more than recommended on the bottle but still well within the realm of a reasonable dose. Like an edible the effects took many hours to kick in, and then the high came on fast. I am also largely intolerant of caffeine and alcohol. However I never have any noticeable effects from most vitamins and herbal products. Not against CBD. Just saying it is possible, even if no one believes you.
Along with its better-known counterpart, THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the chemical that produces the marijuana high), CBD is one of more than 400 compounds found in the oils of cannabis plant species, which include marijuana and hemp. Unlike THC, CBD will not make you high. That said, this doesn’t mean CBD is not at all psychoactive, as many assert, says Jahan Marcu, Ph.D., director of experimental pharmacology and behavior at the International Research Center on Cannabis and Mental Health in New York City: “CBD does change cognition. It affects mood, which is why people take it for anxiety. And some find that it makes them more alert.”
Cannabis and alcohol both increase alpha and theta sleep and decrease delta sleep. Cannabis and alcohol inhibit delta sleep needed for the night time brain housekeeping duties and increase luteinizing hormone so core body temperature does not drop for brain cells to shrink for 60% more space between brain cells for the cerebral spinal fluid to wash out toxins. Since pot inhibits delta sleep, it also inhibits growth hormone and also dehydrates you, so klotho is reduced. Cannabis causes kidney stones by reduced klotho. Klotho is anti tumor, anti dementia, inhibits arteriosclerosis, osteoporosis, and skin atrophy, so since cannabis inhibits klotho, aging is increased. Cannibis decreases sex hormones, increases stress hormones, impairs fertility, inhibits copulation, reduces oxytocin-the love and protection hormone.
Amazingly, CBD also showed positive benefits in treating or preventing Alzheimer’s disease. As CBD lowers inflammation, it helps prevent nerves from degenerating. During one study, scientists used mice with the genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease. They found that CBD helped by preventing the mice’s cognitive decline.CBD can have beneficial effects on people who suffer neurological disorders such as epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. Amazingly, CBD showed positive benefits in treating or preventing Alzheimer’s disease. As CBD lowers inflammation, it helps prevent nerves from degenerating.
The etymology is uncertain but there appears to be no common Proto-Indo-European source for the various forms of the word; the Greek term kánnabis is the oldest attested form, which may have been borrowed from an earlier Scythian or Thracian word.[10][11] Then it appears to have been borrowed into Latin, and separately into Slavic and from there into Baltic, Finnish, and Germanic languages.[12] Following Grimm's law, the "k" would have changed to "h" with the first Germanic sound shift,[10][13] after which it may have been adapted into the Old English form, hænep. However, this theory assumes that hemp was not widely spread among different societies until after it was already being used as a psychoactive drug, which Adams and Mallory (1997) believe to be unlikely based on archaeological evidence.[10] Barber (1991) however, argued that the spread of the name "kannabis" was due to its historically more recent drug use, starting from the south, around Iran, whereas non-THC varieties of hemp are older and prehistoric.[12] Another possible source of origin is Assyrian qunnabu, which was the name for a source of oil, fiber, and medicine in the 1st millennium BC.[12]
The results “suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction,” the study authors wrote—but they also admit that their findings are preliminary. Ryan Vandrey, PhD, a cannabis researcher and associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University (who was not involved in the 2013 study), agrees that larger, longer-term studies are needed to know if CBD might be helpful for smokers looking to kick the habit.
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