Industrial hemp is a very hardy plant, able to be be grown in areas where other crops will fail. It can withstand periods of drought, heat and frost and also be cultivated without pesticides or other chemicals in many instances – however, it can be subject to attack by insect pests. It doesn’t have huge water requirements or a great need for ongoing care. The plant grows quite quickly, achieving heights of 4 metres in four months.
In your internet travels, you may also come across products called “terpsolates.” The manufacturers of these products infuse CBD Isolate with terpenes (but not cannabinoids like THC). These terpenes may enhance the effectiveness of CBD — or maybe they just make it smell good. This may be a good place to point out that not all CBD products are created equal. The industry is still largely unregulated, and the quality and quantity of CBD in a given product will vary wildly. Third-party testing definitely helps to monitor companies’ claims, but it’s still up to you as the consumer to do your homework on the best CBD products.
   Industrial hemp has low THC levels compared to marijuana specifically cultivated for personal psychoactive use. Whereas marijuana that can be smoked usually contains between five and ten percent THC, industrial hemp contains about one-tenth of that. In order to get a psychoactive effect, one would need to smoke ten or twelve hemp cigarettes over a very short period of time. 
In addition to acting on the brain, CBD influences many body processes. That’s due to the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which was discovered in the 1990s, after scientists started investigating why pot produces a high. Although much less well-known than the cardiovascular, reproductive, and respiratory systems, the ECS is critical. “The ECS helps us eat, sleep, relax, forget what we don’t need to remember, and protect our bodies from harm,” Marcu says. There are more ECS receptors in the brain than there are for opioids or serotonin, plus others in the intestines, liver, pancreas, ovaries, bone cells, and elsewhere.

One of the many myths about the legalising of hemp cultivation is that those growing it will be able to hide the more potent marijuana amongst it. This isn’t viable as the intoxicating variety needs a great deal of space and is easy to pick. The other argument about high THC marijuana pollinating hemp and creating a higher THC hemp is null and void – this simply doesn’t happen. In fact, cross pollination will result in lower-THC marijuana.

The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficacy of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from health care practitioners. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product.


As of December 2018, Hemp is federally legal to grow again in the United States. The government passed the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, part of the 2018 Farm Bill[94] signed by President Donald Trump on 20 December 2018.[94] This bill changed hemp from a controlled substance to an agricultural commodity, legalizing hemp federally, which made it easier for farmers to get production licenses, get loans to grow hemp, and allowed them to get federal crop insurance.[94] Some states still consider it illegal to grow hemp, but 41 states have begun the process to make hemp legal to grow at the state level, as of 2019.[95]
As I research more I am disgusted with how we have all been deceived. I feel confident now with being able to research things on our own, at any moment in time, we can begin to take back our world. In the early 30’s one of the great media conspiracies unfolded. Publisher William Hearst, Dupont, the petroleum interests, the cotton lobby, the bankers and some ignorant politicians lead a crusade to ban hemp to line their pockets. Hemp can revolutionize our society. Please research and pass on!
The great irony of the legal mess concerning industrial hemp is hemp products often aren’t banned in countries where cultivation is; meaning consumers in those countries are spending millions on importing products that could be made locally. Even more perplexing is situations such as in Australia, where most hemp products can be imported, but not hemp seed as food. Yet, poppy seeds can be purchased at the local supermarket.
While hemp was banned along with marijuana in the 1930s, with the increasing information on CBD and the myriad of health benefits it contains, hemp has made a significant comeback. Today there are countless hemp-derived CBD products available on the market that are legal in all 50 states. But what exactly is industrial hemp? And does it really contain CBD?
Textile expert Elizabeth Wayland Barber summarizes the historical evidence that Cannabis sativa, "grew and was known in the Neolithic period all across the northern latitudes, from Europe (Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Romania, Ukraine) to East Asia (Tibet and China)," but, "textile use of Cannabis sativa does not surface for certain in the West until relatively late, namely the Iron Age."[111] "I strongly suspect, however, that what catapulted hemp to sudden fame and fortune as a cultigen and caused it to spread rapidly westwards in the first millennium B.C. was the spread of the habit of pot-smoking from somewhere in south-central Asia, where the drug-bearing variety of the plant originally occurred. The linguistic evidence strongly supports this theory, both as to time and direction of spread and as to cause."[112]
Naturally, scientists wanted to see if CBD oil had any anticancer properties. As a result, they performed several animal studies using it. However, it should be noted that the findings don’t fully apply to humans. In fact, they merely suggest what possible effects CBD might have when it comes to dealing with cancer. With that in mind, additional human studies would help conclude if CBD oil has an effect on cancer cells in humans.

Zuardi, A. W., Crippa, J. A., Hallak, J. E., Bhattacharyya, S., Atakan, Z., Martin-Santos, R., … & Guimarães, F. S. (2012). A critical review of the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol: 30 years of a translational investigation [Abstract]. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18(32), 5,131–5,140. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716160
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