Now that the New Year is behind us and the winter season is in full swing, many of us struggle to keep our resolutions. A “New Year, New You” is the mantra so many adopt but often find it hard to maintain in everyday life. Overall health and wellness is something we should all strive for and find ways to make a lifestyle instead of a resolution. Not only do we want to live longer, but we seek quality of life, healthy bodies, and happiness. Wellness encompasses all these things. But how do you begin your journey to wellness? These simple steps can get you started.
From health and disability insurance to employment and financial planning, members of the MS community have many needs to address. Making sure that you have the appropriate health insurance in place, finding ways to adjust your employment to suit your needs, learning how to apply for disability and other types of government assistance, and planning for the future financially, are all extremely helpful to keeping yourself on track. Please visit this section for more information.
People who experience psychosis may produce too much or even too little cannabinoids (from overactive dopamine receptors). CBD is milder than our internal cannabinoids and helps to re-establish a balance of cannabinoids in the brain. CBD also helps lower inflammation, which is often increased in schizophrenia. THC, on the other hand, is stronger than our internal cannabinoids (anandamide and 2-AG), this way potentially triggering psychosis [R+, R].
The ability of CBD to have effects on the EDC (endocannabinoid system) and other nervous systems has influenced researchers to believe that CBD can provide benefits for neurological disorders. For example, studies are ongoing for the effectiveness of CBD against epilepsy. Presently, there is only one scenario where using cannabidiol treatment for epilepsy has significant scientific evidence.
Other potential side effects include low blood pressure, lightheadedness, and drowsiness, but these have typically only occurred in patients who have exceeded doses of 1,500 mg daily for a period of 4 weeks or more; far more than the average person will need take on a daily basis for chronic pain symptoms. (In fact, the majority of CBD users claim they find an effective dose to be anywhere between 10 and 40 mg daily).

The results “suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction,” the study authors wrote—but they also admit that their findings are preliminary. Ryan Vandrey, PhD, a cannabis researcher and associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University (who was not involved in the 2013 study), agrees that larger, longer-term studies are needed to know if CBD might be helpful for smokers looking to kick the habit.

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