In this review, the effects of cannabinoids in the regulation of the following endocrine systems are discussed: the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex axis. Cannabis users have reduced levels of gonadotropins, reduced prolactin and growth hormone. Cannabis affects corticotropin-releasing hormone-, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-, vasopressin-, and oxytocin-expressing neurons. Therefore, our findings reveal a mechanism of rapid glucocorticoid feedback inhibition of hypothalamic hormone secretion via endocannabinoid release in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and provide a link between the actions of glucocorticoids and cannabinoids in the hypothalamus that regulate stress and energy homeostasis. Glucocorticoid negative feedback in the brain controls stress, feeding, and neural-immune interactions by regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Cannabis increases dopamine which decreases prolactin. Cannabis decreases oxytocin, thyroid hormone and growth hormone, and disrupts the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Cannabinoids suppress fertility via reducing hypothalamic gonadotropin- releasing hormone output. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R)-mediated transmission is a major input to gonadotropin releasing hormone cells that can be excitatory. Cannabinoids act via inhibiting GABAergic input. Cannabis disregulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis circadian rhythm. Cannabis decreases serum concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins. Cannabis raises cortisol and ACTH which increases cortisol which uses up progesterone reducing testosterone and estrogen. Cannabis lowers testosterone in men by inhibiting testosterone secretion and impairs fertility in males through alteration in the testicular endocannabinoid system. Cannabis suppresses copulatory behavior even when testosterone levels are maintained. It decreases sperm concentration, causes defective sperm function or alteration of sperm morphology. Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. Testicular degeneration and necrosis is induced by chronic administration of cannabis. In both ovulating and menopausal women, cannabis can alter pituitary gonadotropin release and alter metabolism or target tissue response to gonadal steroids, leading to reduced estrogen and progesterone production and anovulatory menstrual cycles. Cannabis presents abnormal longer ovulatory cycle lengths in females. Cannabis suppresses luteinizing hormone when sex hormones are initially high, but, chronic cannabis lowers progesterone and testosterone in men, and lowers estrogen and progesterone in women, so luteinizing hormone significantly increases which raises night time core temperature for disrupted sleep. Cannabis increases hypothalamic nitric oxide which inhibits oxytocin. Cannabis is detrimental for lactating moms. Cannabis decreases maternal care, decreases aggressive instinctual behaviors for protection of young, suppresses maternal anxiolysis, decreases plasma oxytocin levels and milk consumption and decreases activation of oxytocinergic neurons in hypothalamic nuclei. Changes in the behavioral responses of lactating mothers treated with cannabis can be related to disruption in the neuroendocrine control of oxytocin secretion. Cannabis causes impairment of glucocorticoid feedback which either enhances or decreases performance on various tasks. Cannibis can cause a decrease in thyroid which negatively affects cerebellar development and motor performance involved in adult brain function. It induces consistent behavioral changes in adults, leading to severe anxiety and morphological changes in the hippocampus, however, it shows improvements for schizophrenia: improvement in cognitive function and reduction of antipsychotic-side. Cannabis and Δ(9) -THC are anticonvulsant in most animal models but can be proconvulsant in some healthy animals. The simultaneous rapid stimulation of nitric oxide and endocannabinoid synthesis by glucocorticoids has important implications for the impact of stress on the brain as well as on neural-immune interactions in the hypothalamus. Cannabis has implications for psychosis. There are blunted psychotomimetic and amnestic effects with cannabis. Lithium increases oxytocin and helps in cannabis withdrawal, and pregnenolone/progesterone help in cannabis withdrawal as estrogen generally increases and progesterone decreases sensitivity to marijuana.
The science behind CBD is in the relatively early stages. As a cannabinoid, we know that CBD interacts with receptors in your endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is integrated throughout your body — and this widespread, whole-body interaction creates a broad range of effects. Hence, the long list of possible benefits.   We may still be in the early stages of discovery, but there’s plenty of scientific studies and anecdotal evidence that CBD provides relief for an array of ailments. Here’s a non-exhaustive list of some potential benefits of CBD oil:

^ Datwyler, SL; Weiblen, GD (2006). "Genetic Variation in Hemp and marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.) sativa plants are taller and less dense. Indica plants are shorter but a lot more dense than sativas. According to Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms". Journal of Forensic Sciences. 51 (2): 371–375. doi:10.1111/j.1556-4029.2006.00061.x. PMID 16566773.


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The etymology is uncertain but there appears to be no common Proto-Indo-European source for the various forms of the word; the Greek term kánnabis is the oldest attested form, which may have been borrowed from an earlier Scythian or Thracian word.[10][11] Then it appears to have been borrowed into Latin, and separately into Slavic and from there into Baltic, Finnish, and Germanic languages.[12] Following Grimm's law, the "k" would have changed to "h" with the first Germanic sound shift,[10][13] after which it may have been adapted into the Old English form, hænep. However, this theory assumes that hemp was not widely spread among different societies until after it was already being used as a psychoactive drug, which Adams and Mallory (1997) believe to be unlikely based on archaeological evidence.[10] Barber (1991) however, argued that the spread of the name "kannabis" was due to its historically more recent drug use, starting from the south, around Iran, whereas non-THC varieties of hemp are older and prehistoric.[12] Another possible source of origin is Assyrian qunnabu, which was the name for a source of oil, fiber, and medicine in the 1st millennium BC.[12]
So, if it’s not psychoactive, what exactly is hemp used for? Ever since the Neolithic Age when farmers in China first cultivated this plant, the use of hemp grew in order to fulfill many different needs people had through history. It is now used to make clothing, biofuels, foods, health products, body care products and even plastic composites. One source suggests that this “magical plant” is currently used to create more than 25 thousand different products – as many as petroleum. The U.S. hemp industry was estimated to be worth around 500 million USD in annual retail sales in 2012, and this number is quickly trending upward, according to Hemp Industries Association.
Dosist has been in the cannabidiol industry for years, even before legalization. The brand provides users with precise doses and pens that allow for the dispersion of the substance. The dispensing mechanism also allows for accurate dosing so that users can start at whatever levels make them the most comfortable. There is also a range of blends and mixtures that users can choose from.
Daniel Clauw, MD, professor of anesthesiology at the University of Michigan, believes that CBD may have real benefits for people living with chronic pain. He cites a recent clinical trial from pharmaceutical company Zynerba (for which Dr. Clauw has consulted) that found that a CBD-derived topical drug provided pain relief to patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis.
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